June 28, 2024

3 Poems by Jonathan Lloyd

3 Poems by Jonathan Lloyd

*Featured image courtesy of David Sinclair on Unsplash*

Jonathan Lloyd joins us with captivating descriptions and a refreshing style that will keep you engaged through all three of his poems.

The old man

from Wales gyascutus

picks his way through

the bramble thorns

on his way to pub.

His knee bothers.

The beer warm.

The company chatty.

The rain.

The window–fogged.

The old man

walks home through

the bramble

across bogs, underneath

bright spilled sky.

The field a rimfull

of misty heaven;

the thorns’ lesson

slumbers, all light,

the window hindsight clear

year on to yesteryear.

There’s no word

for snow in Inuit–

that’s baloney.

Must be fifty.

Yet the Greeks did not

have a word for word.

And they wrote them

alltogetherlikethis

and then

.sihtekilrehtegotlla

The Germans just stick

stuff together to make

a newword.

Nobody cares.

We do what we like.

Except when we fish.

Then we need bait and hook

and line and pole.

We wait.

When a fish is caught

we eat. We eat.

And the fish, we call

it fish,

and it is good.

It is something.

It is something else.

How to become a hawk

First, sip your tea.

Hold it on your tongue

until you must swallow.

There–you notice

the point at which you savor.

Now, spread your arms

and scream, but

from your stomach

up through the throat.

Rise up

on tippy toes.

Feel the wind

at your back

until you begin

to fall. There,

in the savor, the hawk.


A pharmacist by trade, Jonathan tends to sip his coffee in iambic pentameter, probably while re-reading his copy of Don Quixote. His poetry has appeared in “Up the River,” and Andwerve Literary Magazine.” This is his first feature on The Fictional Café

#Jonathan Lloyd#nature#peaceful#poetry#reflective
1 comment
  • Michael Bruebach says:

    “there’s no word” is such a beautiful read!

    And the fish, we call
    it fish,
    and it is good.
    It is something.
    It is something else.

    I love when writers investigate and play with language! Whenever I get to be an audience for a performer that seems to break the 4th wall, I am a happy camper!

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